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Linux Step By Steps
NETWORKING-WITH NETWARE 5

Date: October 16, 2000
Written by Bill Parker (dogbert@netnevada.net)

Tested under OpenLinux 2.3 (linux kernel 2.2.18pre-15, should work for older kernels as well).


Step 1.

Compile the Linux kernel to include the following items (either into the kernel or as modules to be loaded):

Under NETWORKING OPTIONS in the kernel, enable The IPX Protocol and FULL INTERNAL IPX NETWORK (you do not need to use SPX networking here (note under older kernels the last two options may not be available).

Under FILE SYSTEMS/NETWORK FILE SYSTEMS, enable NCP FILESYSTEM support (allows you to MOUNT netware volumes)

Then re-compile your kernel and reboot your system to put kernel into effect.  If you make the above items as MODULES, remember to do make modules and make modules_install to compile the selected items, and in order to load them, you will have to issue the insmod by hand, or load them in a rc type script.

Make sure you also have the latest nwclient+utils rpm loaded, which is nwclient+utils-4.2.1-8 (you can get this info from rpm -qa or rpm -q nwclient+utils)

Step 2.

make sure that ncpfs.o is loaded by issuing the command /sbin/lsmod

it should appear in a list which looks like this:

Module                  Size  Used by
ncpfs                  21904   0  (unused) <--- look here
epca                   36852   0
ip_masq_irc             1712   0  (unused)
ip_masq_raudio          2736   0  (unused)
ip_masq_ftp             2384   0  (unused)

Having this loaded will allow you to mount the netware volume on your linux box and look at the files with commands like ls, etc.

Step 3.

Make sure you have a NIC in your linux box which sees traffic on a Netware LAN segment, then go to /etc/rc.d/init.d and type:

./ipx start <enter>

which should return:

Starting IPX networking:  interface configure.

At this point issue the command: /sbin/ifconfig <enter>

which will return something like this:

eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:90:27:BE:8E:F6
inet addr:xxx.xxx.xxx.55  Bcast:xxx.xxx.xxx.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:1035115 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:38909 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:100
Interrupt:11 Base address:0x6100

eth0:0    Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:90:27:BE:8E:F6
inet addr:xxx.xxx.xxx.155  Bcast:xxxx.xxx.xxx.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
Interrupt:11 Base address:0x6100

eth1      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:A0:C9:65:90:40
inet addr:192.168.5.1  Bcast:192.168.5.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
IPX/Ethernet 802.3 addr:00000004:00A0C9659040    
<--- LOOK HERE
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:1022369 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:4
TX packets:53 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:2 txqueuelen:100
Interrupt:9 Base address:0x6200

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback
inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:3924  Metric:1
RX packets:39 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:39 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0

Now if you look at where it says LOOK HERE, you will notice that IPX/Ethernet is enabled for eth1 (which is the NIC which can see the Novell part of the network in my office)

Step 4.

Now the final step, start the nwclient on your system by going to
/etc/rc.d/init.d and typing:

./nwclient start <enter>

which should produce the following:

Starting the NetWare client: module device nwclientd nwamd

and if you type: cat /var/log/messages <enter> you will see at the bottom:

Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwamd[5898]: NetWare Automounter Daemon Version 4.2.1.
Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwamd[5898]: Copyright (c) Caldera, Inc.
Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwamd[5898]: Copyright (c) Novell, Inc.
Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwclientd[5893]: NetWare Client Version 4.2.1
Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwclientd[5893]: NetWare Client Copyright (c) Novell, Inc.
Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwclientd[5893]: NetWare Client Copyright (c) Caldera, Inc.
Oct 16 16:25:10 pooky nwclientd[5893]: Portions of NetWare Client Copyright (c) RSA Data Security, Inc.

Step 5 - The real test, try to log into your Netware Tree or server

to login to a tree type:

nwlogin -t <your tree name> -u <your user name> -p <your password> <enter>

the system should respond like this:

nwlogin: Default Context is `[Root]'.
nwlogin: Trying server context `O=My Organization'.

if you get this, it works...then you can really have fun with Netware from your linux box.  I have not looked at how to mount netware volumes in Linux, but I will be checking into this (i'm still doing more research, but have been able to list files on a NetWare 5 volume so far).

Also, when done, please make sure you log off the netware server by NWLOGOUT and you can also shutdown the nwclient and ipx by going to /etc/rc.d/init.d and typing:

./nwclient stop <enter>
.../ipx stop <enter>

I do not know if this needs to be done or what, perhaps someone with more knowledge could help me out here?